Institute of Classical Architecture & Art

Awards & Prizes

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2009 Shutze Award Winners


Small Renovation

D. Stanley Dixon, Architects

Dutch Colonial Residence, Georgia Interior, Exterior
This project was a major renovation and addition to a 1940’s Colonial ranch that received a series of unfortunate renovations in the early 1980’s. The transformation into a charming Dutch Colonial style cottage required major modifications to the floor plan, exterior facade and roof. The result gave this house a classic and timeless aesthetic with a comfortable and charming feel.

The exterior renovation is defined by a new wood shake gambrel roof with gambrel face centered above a new portico and entry. These elements are further supported by the newly positioned windows and dormers to either side of the entry and main facade. The design and material selection of the dormers, shutters, hardware, siding and roof were all followed through with great thought and detail.

The interior of the house maintains a refined level of restraint in the American Style. The drastic alterations to the plan and structure of the house required a completely new design for the interior finishes and details. Many of the wood finishes found throughout the interior were carefully selected and milled from the homeowner’s farm south of Atlanta. Some of these materials include the random width white oak flooring, pine ship lap board walls, heart pine kitchen counter and dining room mantle. The use of these materials give the house an authentic sense of place and connection, which was very important for the homeowner. The overall aesthetics of the interiors were also enhanced through the use of reclaimed materials. In the living room, 18th century brick was used to rebuild the fireplace hearth and surround. Fir beams were salvaged from a barn in rural Georgia to adorn the ceiling of the keeping room.

Interior design decisions were made to compliment material selection and reinforce the American colonial vernacular. The cornice in the living room, dining room and entry incorporate a drilled motif giving these rooms a simple elegance typical of the style. The powder room vanity design and laundry room door, complete with bullet glazing, add another layer of detail to a final product that remains true to its original colonial design.


Large Renovation

Fairfax & Sammons

Palm Beach Estate
Black


Small Addition/Restoration

Harrison Design Associates

Oakley Residence
Sited at the crest of a heavily wooded hill, the house is approached from a curving drive that terminates in a circular court. The formal, five-part Georgian design conveys the appearance of a characteristic story of American homes — the main house was built first, outbuildings were added later and over time they were connected to the main house with enclosed passageways. This created history is conveyed through the detailing. All walls are made of fine Flemish bond brickwork, but the major block is detailed in limestone and the outbuilding are accented with simpler brick quoins. The entry is finely detailed in Indiana limestone including Doric columns supporting a curving entablature and fluted Ionic pilasters framing the mahogany entry door.

From the curving porch, one enters into a circular domed rotunda with a graceful stair ascending to an open gallery above. From this point one can circulate to the dining room or continue on axis to the living room and gardens beyond. The formal dining room has a developed cornice and broken pediment overdoors and a fireplace surround of carved marble. The living room has a cornice with modillions and a noteworthy mantle that reproduces the Coade stone parlor mantle of the Tayloe (Octagon) House of 1798 in Washington, D.C. designed by Dr. William Thornton, original architect of the U.S. Capitol. The elegant study with its Federal-styled mantle and egg-and-dart cornice with dentil band is made of American white pine resawn from 150-year-old timbers salvaged from demolished buildings.

The five-part garden façade looks over the formal garden and pool. Doric pilasters supporting an entablature divide the three sets of paired doors. By placing the covered porches to either side, the living room within has a high level of light and an immediate visual connection with the formal garden and pool.


Large Addition/Restoration

Spitzmiller & Norris, Inc.

Private Residence, Atlanta, Georgia Stair, Residence
One of a city’s most beloved residential landmarks, this house was designed and built in 1936. A white brick Adam-style residence, fronted by an elegant portico of attenuated Corinthian columns, it occupies a prominent rise overlooking a sweep of lawn five hundred feet to the street.

In October 2000, a disastrous fire saw the near loss of this treasured building, which had just undergone a year-long renovation. As discouraging as this was to the new owners of the house, the fire provided an opportunity for them to rethink their priorities for their home. As a result, a completely new program was determined which included a meticulous restoration of the original public rooms of the house; the redesign and rebuilding of the now-destroyed “north” wing, and the addition of a pool and pool-and-guest house.

In the areas to be restored, water caused more extensive damage than the fire. The documentation, removal, and storage of original detailing proved quite a challenge, as did the delicately conducted job of opening and drying the saturated walls and floors. When restoration work could actually begin, the house had been scraped down to a roofless shell. Owing to thorough documentation done prior to the fire, particularly of the exterior of the house, the correct roof and cornice, as well as, the windows, trim and entrance portico could be rebuilt as original.

For the interiors, moulds were made from remnants of the plaster ceiling and wall ornamentation so that exact duplicates of the intricate originals could be cast or run and reinstalled. Beyond these formal rooms, the owners allowed themselves the freedom to reshape spaces for a more “family-friendly” environment to be enjoyed with their children and their casual guests. Among the more significant of the newly designed spaces, was a family living room and solarium created in the former north wing. Outside the new living room a two-story portico with balcony opening off the second floor was added. From the solarium, a trio of French doors open onto custom-designed wrought iron balconies each supported by a carved heroic limestone acanthus leaf (inspired by a similar balcony support from an early nineteenth-century Savannah house). What was previously used as a morning room was rechristened “the library”. New shelving and trim was designed to accommodate hundreds of books. The finished room was grained to simulate 18th-century French oak. The formal dining room was given an additional interior point of entry for better circulation and was connected by French doors with the new rear terrace. Decoratively, it was newly detailed with painted boiserie paneling. Mirrored niches and fanlights over the doors were created to reflect the light from the crystal chandelier. A transverse hall was designed to conveniently connect the family rooms to the public rooms. Here a curved stair, surmounted by an oval bronze-muntined skylight, provides vertical access between all floors of the house.

As a final exercise in bringing this wonderful old house completely into the twenty-first century, the attic was redesigned as a playroom and media room for the children and the basement was excavated (by hand labor) to accommodate for a wine cellar and tasting room.


Landscape/Garden Design

Alec G. Michaelides, Land Plus Associates, Ltd.

An English Country Estate – Atlanta, Georgia
This Estate is a classic English Country Estate set on five acres in the exclusive Buckhead community of Atlanta. The topographic conditions of the property encouraged and enhanced the creation of separate outdoor “rooms” in the landscape. These landscape design elements supported specific activities typical of estate homes on large tracts of land, including:

  • A formal entertaining lawn
  • An elegant pool area with open-air garden pavilion shade structure
  • A vegetable garden
  • A kitchen garden for outdoor dining
  • An elegant family motor court
  • A receiving garden at the entrance to the home

Formal, clipped hedges and perennial-lined paths created “hallways” between these outdoor areas. Custom designed iron gates formed a green portal separating the kitchen garden from the other more elegant outdoor entertaining spaces.

The expanse of the property allowed for the creation of an elegant, private pool area set apart from the view of the residence. The forms and materials were arranged to create an inviting transition between the formal pool area and the surrounding naturalized landscape.
The design included a long drive reminiscent of a gravel country lane and a park-like system of trails with naturalized and perennial plantings to complete the overall look and feel of an estate in the English countryside.

Finally, to complete the estate-like environment, large 60’-tall specimen shade trees were strategically located within and around the estate. These stately specimens create that time-honored elegance for this majestic property.


Craftsmanship

Savannah College of Art & Design

Ivy Hall – The Edward C. Peters Mansion Stair, House
The restoration of the Edward C. Peters residence commenced in 2006 and was completed in the fall of 2008. Designed by architect Gottfried L. Norman, the residence is considered to be an outstanding example of the Queen Anne Victorian movement of the late 19th century. Ivy Hall is listed as a City of Atlanta Landmark structure and is listed in the National Register. The asymmetrical structure is composed of well-formed masonry units throughout and supported by a granite foundation. A shingle course of terra cotta is found on the west and south elevations and the roof is of slate. The west façade of the building incorporates a two story porte cochere that services the main entry way which, in design, displays elements of the Romanesque style at the base, the Renaissance movement at the second level and Elizabethan elements at the half timbered gable roof end above. Typical of the Victorian style the architect in his design has rendered a harmonious blending of over a thousand years of architecture whose roots are all bound in classicism.

Although substantially intact, the mansion has been vacant for seven years and was damaged by fire, vandalism and failure of the roof and gutters. An exhaustive one- year study produced a plan of action for restoration and conservation of interior and exterior architectural elements that would result in a worthy and lasting example of the Victorian movement. The project implementation required the expertise of a diverse group of craftsmen, technicians and conservators who, similar to the style of architecture, would work together in a harmonious manner to reclaim the grand structure.


Residential Interior Design

D. Stanley Dixon, Architect

Georgian Revival Residence Dining Room Sensitively scaled, the new construction of this home replaced a 1950’s modernist ranch built in the Historic 1920’s Brookhaven Golf Community north of Atlanta. The Georgian Revival style plays out on the exterior and continues through to every detail of the interior.

The Georgian Revival street facade was carefully studied to keep the scale of the large house appropriate within the context of older, established homes within the neighborhood. The painted brick, Buckingham slate roof and painted wood Chippendale and Georgian trim created a timeless palette of materials. To accommodate the narrow lot and the modern family lifestyle of our clients, we decided on an ‘L’ shaped plan.

True to the Georgian Revival style, immediately entering the house the axial arrangement of rooms and views are apparent. The flooring on the first floor consists of antique black and white marble, reclaimed herringbone oak and black Belgium stone. The interior face of the main entry door is crotch mahogany with hand carved egg and dart molding. The mahogany was stained and finished using a genuine French polish resulting in a rich, old world finish. The surrounding transom and sidelights are crafted of glass with lead caming. The dining room mantle was designed and full scale drawings were created to convey the intent to the craftsman, who carefully hand carved the design. The dining room walls are finished with hand painted scenic panels. The sitting room walls are paneled with clear cypress and detailed with fluted pilasters, hand-carved scrolls, and Chippendale fret work. The paneling was finished reminiscent of aged, bleached cypress and provides a warm and inviting place for the family to gather. The adjoining library is paneled in a deep, rich walnut. The bookcase in the panel doubles as a secret door to the sitting room. A hand carved ebonized mahogany hand rail with painted balusters gracefully lead you to the upstairs. A Palladian style window greats you with sunlight at the upper landing as you approach the wide upper hall leading to the family bedrooms.

While accommodating many necessities of an active family, this new residence maintains a balanced sense of classic style and proportions.


Small Institutional

Historical Concepts

President’s House – Florida State University
Designed by Historical Concepts, an Atlanta based firm specializing in traditional architecture, this stately Greek Revival structure serves as the official residence of the President of Florida State University. With direct input from the University’s current President, Dr. T.K. Wetherell, and his wife, Virginia, Historical Concepts’ design team set out to create a campus icon that was befitting of the institution’s long and esteemed history. Together, they imagined a venerable old home that would feel as if it pre-dated the Tallahassee campus, with the University growing up around it. While the new President’s Home appears to be a grand estate of a bygone era, its use is as much institutional as it is residential; this campus facility is a prominent venue for hosting a range of public events and official University functions. Since its completion in August of 2007, the FSU President’s Home has hosted a range of events and more than 12,000 visitors, including students, faculty, staff, alumni, legislators and government officials, national and international dignitaries and scholars, corporate representatives, key constituents and friends.

To give the FSU President’s Home a distinctive style that would be regionally appropriate, yet not look institutional, Historical Concepts looked to Greek Revival architecture for inspiration, emulating the scale, proportions and materials of the old plantation homes that are found throughout the Tallahassee area. Fluted Greek Doric columns showcase the formal entry, while “infilled porches” on the more casual rear façade suggest that the home has undergone generational adaptations.

Period-inspired architectural elements are present on both the exterior and interior, where the symmetrical floorplan provides classic order. The large and imposing trim profiles, door and window casings, as well as crown moldings were produced by students in Florida State University’s Master Craftsman Program, using modern techniques to emulate traditional plasterwork. Antique heart pine floors, including circa 1929 end-cut heart pine blocks reclaimed from the University’s original gymnasium, provide history underfoot. Vintage materials combine with modern technologies to create a structure that honors FSU’s past while being well-equipped to serve the University’s future.

From an aesthetic standpoint, the design of the home is a straightforward interpretation of classical Greek Revival architecture, yet the challenge of accommodating public, institutional and residential uses within the framework of a private residence required a great deal of creativity and planning. A former President of FSU, Doak Campbell suggested in his 1964 book, A University in Transition, a president’s house is “much more than merely a place for the president and his family to live.” He noted that it should be a gracious setting for the University to extend its hospitality and celebrate its accomplishments. Having studied the President’s residences on well-known campuses, President and Mrs. Wetherells’ directive to Historical Concepts was that the home needed to “function comfortably, whether being used by 2 or 200 people”. This required the design team to find ways to integrate commercial equipment and systems into the home without detracting from its residential appearance or infringing on the privacy of its residents. The design team addressed these challenges by providing for three distinct levels graduating in use from public to private and institutional to residential spaces.

Lower Level: The slope of the site allowed for full utilization of the lower level. With its more rustic and casual finish, this space is used for a wide range of activities and includes a catering kitchen, a bar, a gathering room with high-tech audio visual system, a billiards room and a screened terrace. French Doors lining the rear wall open to allow for large scale indoor/outdoor events utilizing the terrace and lawn beyond, where hundreds of people can celebrate athletic victories or academic achievements. With a separate vehicular drive and pedestrian approach, guests can come and go without restricting the access to the private quarters above.

Main Level: Serving as a transition from the public to private levels, this space serves the daily needs of the family, while also offering formal areas for personal entertaining and small University functions. To ensure that there would be appropriately-scaled areas for hosting 2 or 20, the floorplan is divided into rooms of various sizes while still providing for circulation. Recessed panels in cased openings between rooms can be closed to direct circulation and separate spaces.

Upper Level: Strictly the personal quarters for the University President and his family, this level has a master suite and two guest suites, as well a private porch, living room, sitting room, office and morning kitchen.

By tiering the private and public uses by floor and sensitively integrating commercial equipment and spaces, Historical Concepts was able to create a home with historical authenticity. The formal spaces of the main and upper levels reflect a traditional Greek Revival estate of the late 19th century, while the lower level conveys a sense of adaptive re-use to serve the University’s 21st century needs.

With more than 13,000 square feet, the three-level campus facility is a testament to the dedication of the President and Mrs. Wetherell. A respected leader in both the public and private sector, Virginia Wetherell spearheaded the design and fundraising for this project. Funded through private donations and gifts totaling more than $4 million, no public money was used for its construction. To pay homage to FSU’s history and traditions, Mrs. Wetherell filled the home with antiques donated by alumni and artwork on loan from the University’s archives and the John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art. This newly completed home and campus facility will be an enduring legacy of President and Mrs. Wetherell, from whose efforts emerged an emblematic campus building that captures the heritage of this educational institution.


Large Institutional – Classical

Hartman-Cox Architects

Special Collections Library – University of Virginia
This new 74,000 square foot building houses the Harrison Institute (above grade) and the University’s Rare Books and Special Collections (below grade), which include valuable documents such as Thomas Jefferson’s original papers. As an adjunct to the main University libraries, the new facility establishes a separate but related identity. It completes the academic quadrangle, which is adjacent to Thomas Jefferson’s historic Academical Village. It is part of the University’s main library cluster, including Clemons (undergraduate library and media center), Alderman (the main library) and now the Special Collections Library.

The building provides exhibition and meeting space and a new below grade archive that houses the main reading room and the special collection stacks. The decision to construct the bulk of the new library below grade allows the academic quadrangle, the second most important campus space, to remain an open green. The entire quad has been re-terraced and landscaped as part of the Harrison Institute and Special Collections project.

Our intent was to design a building, which would seamlessly complete the academic quadrangle.


Large Institutional – Traditional

Hartman-Cox Architects

Divinity School Addition – Duke University
The new Divinity School addition is located in the lower court (hollow) below and adjacent to the Duke Chapel and the “New Divinity” wing (built in 1970). The addition faces the Memorial Garden and the side of the Duke Chapel, completing the cloister formed by Duke Chapel and the open loggia that links the Chapel to the original Divinity School Building. The site accommodates the new multi-story addition of approximately 45,500 gross square feet.

In general, the plans of the two existing buildings — “New Divinity” and the original building — have long, relatively narrow, double-loaded corridors that connect classroom and office suites. There is no central public orientation area or circulation hub in the existing buildings. While functional, it is not an arrangement which promotes collegiality or teacher-student interaction. The new building creates a more centrally oriented arrangement, radial rather than linear. New focus spaces or circulation hubs have been incorporated in the plan at the entrances and adjacent the new Chapel, Refectory/Bookstore area. Furthermore, the circulation spaces and corridors are wide enough to encourage informal socializing.

Beyond the Memorial Wall the site falls off steeply from an elevation of 398 feet to 372 feet. The design takes advantage of this slope by locating three terraced floors between New Divinity and the Memorial Wall. The upper and middle levels of the addition align with the First and Basement floors of Old and New Divinity. Due to the ceiling height of new classrooms, the lower or classroom level of the addition is depressed into grade and does not align with any of the existing floors of New or Old Divinity. Ramps and stairs provide the connection.

The new Chapel is located on the mid-level between the entrances from the Memorial Garden and the entrance from the parking to the north. Locating the main floor of the Chapel on the mid-level reduces its height relative to Duke Chapel, producing a massing that comfortably cascades down the hill. The Refectory, also located at the mid-level, can serve as a social area for the Chapel. The preferred seating plan for the New Chapel is a central “gathering” as opposed to a more linear “spectator” type plan. The new arcade and chapel are Collegiate Gothic in style and constructed of “Duke Stone” to match Duke Chapel and the original Divinity School Building. The terraced office/classroom levels in the center are largely glass and “Duke Stone” colored brick.

The intent was to design an addition which would be stylistically compatible with the Duke Chapel and “New Divinity.”


Residential Multi-Family

de la Guardia Victoria Architects

Almeria Row
Almeria Row is a multi-family development project that introduces the traditional townhouse typology to Coral Gables. The two phased project consists of ten townhouses built on fee simple parcels measuring an average 23’ x 120’. The first five units were completed in the fall of 2007, and a second phase is planned for future construction. In a happy and productive collaboration between city, patron and architect, the City of Coral Gables zoning code was amended to establish a new residential type, the classic townhouse common in cities such as New York and Boston. The size of each parcel, approximately 2,500 square feet, establishes a new minimum size lot for single family residences and allows as well for higher densities in the immediacy of the city center. The residences are neither a condominium unit nor a detached residential unit, but rather attached single family residencies that share common walls.

The townhouses are each two stories, ranging in size between 2,840 and 3,037 square feet, and are composed of two volumes connected by a courtyard. The main volume consists of a first floor housing the public program and a second floor with bedrooms and baths. The second volume consists of a two car garage on the ground floor and two bedrooms on the second floor reached by an open staircase in the courtyard.

Almeria Row recovers a housing option which is as old and universal as the city itself, and adapts it for the South Florida climate and geography. The project is designed along traditional concepts of composition and style, resulting in elegant residential units and a singular street section that redefines the character of the neighborhood.


Residential Under 4,000 Square Feet

David Jones Architects

Potomac River House


Residential 4,000 to 10,000 Square Feet

David Jones Architects

Locust Hil
Built in 2000 – 2002, this house is designed as a narrative of what might have been built over a much longer period of time.

This odd-shaped hilltop property with numerous mature trees has a narrow frontage on a winding street in suburban Washington, DC. The architects’ goal was to accommodate the clients’ need for a house large enough for their growing family, folding 8500 square feet into a simple stone “farmhouse” with later “additions”. We wanted the house to fit in with the rather modest scale of the neighborhood — while retaining as many existing trees as possible.

The main two-story block, housing the more public first floor spaces, might have been the original farmstead — locally vernacular in style, simple and sturdy. A large stone outbuilding, located to the northeast, might have been built at the same time. The Greek revival porch and the entry portico on the gable end ennoble the stone farmhouse.

Subsequent telescoping stone and clapboard additions would have been constructed as the family prospered. This wing houses the more private, family spaces which lead out to the large private lawn to the west. Here, the pool and pool-house reflect the Greek revival roots and the new prosperity of Locust Hill.

Viewing the house from Lawton Street, at the bottom of Locust Hill, the passerby sees the “original” two-story block with porches and glimpses the “original” outbuilding. The telescoping wings, breezeway, pool and pool house are eclipsed by the hill’s rise and the main block, hidden from view. The narrative unfolds as the visitor turns up the private drive; the true size of the house revealed only as he or she approaches the front door.

Residential Over 10,000 Square Feet_Georgian Residence_Harrison Design Associates
Sited at the crest of a heavily wooded hill, the house is approached from a curving drive that terminates in a circular court. The formal, five-part Georgian design conveys the appearance of a characteristic story of American homes – the main house was built first, outbuildings were added later and over time they were connected to the main house with enclosed passageways. This created history is conveyed through the detailing. All walls are made of fine Flemish bond brickwork, but the major block is detailed in limestone and the outbuilding are accented with simpler brick quoins. The entry is finely detailed in Indiana limestone including Doric columns supporting a curving entablature and fluted Ionic pilasters framing the mahogany entry door.

From the curving porch, one enters into a circular domed rotunda with a graceful stair ascending to an open gallery above. From this point one can circulate to the dining room or continue on axis to the living room and gardens beyond. The formal dining room has a developed cornice and broken pediment overdoors and a fireplace surround of carved marble. The living room has a cornice with modillions and a noteworthy mantle that reproduces the Coade stone parlor mantle of the Tayloe (Octagon) House of 1798 in Washington, D.C. designed by Dr. William Thornton, original architect of the U.S. Capitol. The elegant study with its Federal-styled mantle and egg-and-dart cornice with dentil band is made of American white pine resawn from 150-year-old timbers salvaged from demolished buildings.

The five-part garden façade looks over the formal garden and pool. Doric pilasters supporting an entablature divide the three sets of paired doors. By placing the covered porches to either side, the living room within has a high level of light and an immediate visual connection with the formal garden and pool.


Residential Over 10,000 Square Feet

Harrison Design Associates

Georgian Residence
Sited at the crest of a heavily wooded hill, the house is approached from a curving drive that terminates in a circular court. The formal, five-part Georgian design conveys the appearance of a characteristic story of American homes — the main house was built first, outbuildings were added later and over time they were connected to the main house with enclosed passageways. This created history is conveyed through the detailing. All walls are made of fine Flemish bond brickwork, but the major block is detailed in limestone and the outbuilding are accented with simpler brick quoins. The entry is finely detailed in Indiana limestone including Doric columns supporting a curving entablature and fluted Ionic pilasters framing the mahogany entry door.

From the curving porch, one enters into a circular domed rotunda with a graceful stair ascending to an open gallery above. From this point one can circulate to the dining room or continue on axis to the living room and gardens beyond. The formal dining room has a developed cornice and broken pediment overdoors and a fireplace surround of carved marble. The living room has a cornice with modillions and a noteworthy mantle that reproduces the Coade stone parlor mantle of the Tayloe (Octagon) House of 1798 in Washington, D.C. designed by Dr. William Thornton, original architect of the U.S. Capitol. The elegant study with its Federal-styled mantle and egg-and-dart cornice with dentil band is made of American white pine resawn from 150-year-old timbers salvaged from demolished buildings.

The five-part garden façade looks over the formal garden and pool. Doric pilasters supporting an entablature divide the three sets of paired doors. By placing the covered porches to either side, the living room within has a high level of light and an immediate visual connection with the formal garden and pool.