Sleeping Ariadne

Discobulus

Bust of Juno

Plaster Cast Collection

Scroll to browse highlights on view in the ICAA Cast Hall, including pieces deaccessioned from The Metropolitan Museum of Art as well as the Dick Reid Teaching Collection.

In 2004, the Metropolitan Museum of Art deaccessioned a historic collection of 120 plaster casts. The Metropolitan Museum of Art identified the ICAA as an appropriate steward of this significant collection due to the organization’s ongoing efforts to perpetuate the classical tradition in architecture and the related arts. The collection of plaster casts represents rare, high artistry in the craft of mold making and casting, and is an invaluable part of an education in traditional architecture and the allied arts. The ICAA uses the cast collection as a visual teaching aid, enabling students to view and draw from the finest examples of classical elements from masterpieces abroad. Read a brief history of the plaster cast collection.

Dick Reid is one of the world’s leading architectural artisans and restored numerous Medieval, Renaissance, and Enlightenment-era buildings in and outside of London, including the Somerset House, Windsor Castle, and the Spencer House. In 2005, Mr. Reid retired and donated the items in his shop, some of which are also visible on this page, to be used as a visual teaching aid for the ICAA.

The Plaster Cast Hall is possible thanks to the generous support of Flower Construction, Foster Reeve & Associates, and Seth Weine. 

Visiting the Collection

Highlights of the plaster cast collection are on view in the ICAA’s Cast Hall by appointment. School groups are encouraged to visit. Please email [email protected] or call 212-730-9646 × 116 to arrange a visit.  

Admission to view the collection is free. Please consider making a donation to support the collection and the ICAA's educational initiatives.

Discobolus
Greek

This piece is a Roman copy of a Greek statue by Myron from about 450 B.C. In the original the head is turned toward the hand which holds the disk (cf. No. 561). The Roman version was found in Hadrian’s Villa at Tivoli and is now in the British Museum.

Provenance

The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Dimensions

69 x 45 x 18 in. (HWD)

Location:

20 West 44th Street, New York, NY

Diadoumenos
Greek

This is a full-scale 19th Century plaster cast from a Roman copy of the Greek bronze original by Polykleitos. Diadoumenos is a youth binding his head with a fillet, which was a sign of victory in the games. The curved upper body and poised feet imbue the youth’s form with vitality and movement. Found at Vaison, France, the original is now in the British Museum.

Provenance

The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Dimensions

75 x 39 x 23 in. (HWD)

Location:

20 West 44th Street, New York, NY

Crouching Aphrodite
Greek

This is a cast of the Crouching Aphrodite (Venus de Vienne). It is a 19th Century plaster cast of a Roman copy of a statue by Daidalos of Bithynia, of the third century B.C. Aphrodite’s nude physique and voluptuous figure characterize her as the Greek goddess of love. First at Vienne, France, the original is presently at the Louvre Museum.

Provenance

The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Dimensions

43 x 20 x 27 in (HWD)

Location:

20 West 44th Street, New York, NY

Sleeping Ariadne
Greek

According to Greek mythology, Ariadne was a princess of the kingdom of Crete. Ariadne fell in love with Theseus and helped him kill the Minotaur and escape the deadly labyrinth. Theseus was supposed to marry Ariadne and return with her to Athens, however, mid-voyage he abandoned her while she slept on the island of Naxos. The cast is copied from a statue, now housed in the Vatican, which is probably a Roman copy of a piece produced during the Hellenistic period.

Provenance

The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Dimensions

44 x 41 x 28 in. (HWD)

Location:

20 West 44th Street, New York, NY

Corinthian Capital
Greek

Provenance

The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Dimensions

23 x 18 x 18 in. (HWD)

Location:

20 West 44th Street, New York, NY

Vase Head
Greek

Provenance

The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Dimensions

19 x 22 x 22 in. (HWD)

Location:

20 West 44th Street, New York, NY

Frieze Relief
Greek

This plaster cast is a piece of a decorative band of a larger unknown structure. The deeply carved floral motifs create visual interest through the interplay of light and shadow. The overlapping of the figural forms contributes to the viewer’s sense of depth as well as transforms what was once originally static, cold, lifeless marble into a dynamic scene of fecundity and growth. 

Provenance

The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Dimensions

31 1/2 x 61 3/8 x 16 7/8 in. (HWD)

Location:

20 West 44th Street, New York, NY

Ionic capital with Alpha and Omega symbols 
Greek

Provenance

Dick Reid Teaching Collection

Dimensions

14 x 12 x 5 in. (HWD)

Location:

20 West 44th Street, New York, NY

Volute scroll
Greek

Volute scroll with acanthus leaf, source unknown.

Dimensions

20 1/2 x 11 x 11 in. (HWD)

Location:

20 West 44th Street, New York, NY

Building detail
Greek

Tiered architectural frieze, source unknown.

Dimensions

41 x 70 x 11 1/2 in. (HWD)

Location:

20 West 44th Street, New York, NY

Pilaster capital
Greek

Erechtheion corner detail

Provenance

The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Dimensions

20 x 27 1/2 x 10 in. (HWD)

Location:

20 West 44th Street, New York, NY

A damaged pilaster capital
Greek

Source unknown.

Dimensions

23 x 23 1/2 x 12 in. (HWD)

Location:

20 West 44th Street, New York, NY

Erectheion coffer
Greek

This cast replicates a coffer from the Erechtheion. Coffers, sunken panels usually seen in a series, were used for the decoration of ceilings and vaults. The earliest examples are stone coffers from ancient Greece and Rome. The Erechtheion was constructed from 421 to 406 BC on the Acropolis of Athens. As one of the most decorative temples in Greek Architecture, it was built to replace the Temple of Athena, Nike. The name of the temple comes from its dedication to the Greek hero Ericthonius, or perhaps King Erectheus. On major feature of the Erechtheion is the porch of caryatids, often called the “Porch of the Maidens,” where six female figures are sculpted as supporting columns. The temple has two porches - a porch with caryatids and a porch with ionic columns.

Provenance

The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Dimensions

37 x 24 x 3 in. (HWD)

Location:

20 West 44th Street, New York, NY

Volute scroll detail
Greek

Ionic capital fragment, source unknown.

Dimensions

10 x 10 1/2 x 10 1/2 in. (HWD)

Location:

20 West 44th Street, New York, NY

Erechtheion: Base
Greek

The Erechtheion was constructed from 421 to 406 BC on the Acropolis of Athens. As one of the most decorative temples in Greek Architecture, it was built to replace the Temple of Athena, Nike. The name of the temple comes from its dedication to the Greek hero Ericthonius, or perhaps King Erectheus. On major feature of the Erechtheion is the porch of caryatids, often called the “Porch of the Maidens,” where six female figures are sculpted as supporting columns. The temple has two porches - a porch with caryatids and a porch with ionic columns. This cast replicates a base from the columns of the Erechtheion.

Provenance

The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Dimensions

24 x 40 1/2 x 10 in. (HWD)

Location:

20 West 44th Street, New York, NY

Lion head water spout from Temple of Zeus at Olympia
Greek

Source unknown.

Dimensions

20 x 24 x 6 3/4 in. (HWD)

Location:

20 West 44th Street, New York, NY

Plaque with men fighting bull
Greek

Dimensions

19 x 30 x 3 in. (HWD)

Location:

20 West 44th Street, New York, NY

Head of a Goddess
Greek

This plaster cast head of a goddess is most likely a copy of a fragment of a full-length sculpture dating from the Ancient Greek period. The origin of the original work is unclear. The cast has been thoroughly cleaned.

Provenance

The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Dimensions

20 x 14 x 15 in. (HWD)

Location:

20 West 44th Street, New York, NY