Sleeping Ariadne

Discobulus

Bust of Juno

Plaster Cast Collection

Scroll to browse highlights on view in the ICAA Cast Hall, including pieces deaccessioned from The Metropolitan Museum of Art as well as the Dick Reid Teaching Collection.

In 2004, the Metropolitan Museum of Art deaccessioned a historic collection of 120 plaster casts. The Metropolitan Museum of Art identified the ICAA as an appropriate steward of this significant collection due to the organization’s ongoing efforts to perpetuate the classical tradition in architecture and the related arts. The collection of plaster casts represents rare, high artistry in the craft of mold making and casting, and is an invaluable part of an education in traditional architecture and the allied arts. The ICAA uses the cast collection as a visual teaching aid, enabling students to view and draw from the finest examples of classical elements from masterpieces abroad. Read a brief history of the plaster cast collection.

Dick Reid is one of the world’s leading architectural artisans and restored numerous Medieval, Renaissance, and Enlightenment-era buildings in and outside of London, including the Somerset House, Windsor Castle, and the Spencer House. In 2005, Mr. Reid retired and donated the items in his shop, some of which are also visible on this page, to be used as a visual teaching aid for the ICAA.

The Plaster Cast Hall is possible thanks to the generous support of Flower Construction, Foster Reeve & Associates, and Seth Weine. 

Visiting the Collection

Highlights of the plaster cast collection are on view in the ICAA’s Cast Hall by appointment. School groups are encouraged to visit. Please email [email protected] or call 212-730-9646 × 116 to arrange a visit.  

Admission to view the collection is free. Please consider making a donation to support the collection and the ICAA's educational initiatives.

Equestrian Statue of Gattamelata by Donatello
Renaissance

This cast is of the Equestrian Statue of Gattamelata by Donatello; it is a revival of the ancient Roman type. Completed around 1450, Donatello’s statue stands triumphantly outside of the Basilica of Saint Anthony of Padua.

Provenance

The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Dimensions

40 x 20 x 50 in. (HWD)

Location:

20 West 44th Street, New York, NY

Church of San Miniato al Monte: Base with Lion's Feet
Renaissance

This cast is of a base with lion’s feet from from the Monument of Cardinal Jacopo of Portugal in the Chapel of San Giocomo in the Church of San Miniato al Monte in Florence.

Provenance

The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Dimensions

22 x 29 x 11 in. (HWD)

Location:

20 West 44th Street, New York, NY

Church of Westerkerk: Column Capital 
Renaissance

The cast of the pilaster capital comes from the Church of Westerkerk in Ekhuisen, Holland designed by Jan Terwn Aertsz. This very simple detail is painted to resemble wood.

Provenance

The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Dimensions

24 x 16 x 9 in. (HWD)

Location:

20 West 44th Street, New York, NY

Basilica di Santa Maria del Fiore: Detail from Porta della Mondorla
Renaissance

The Basilica di Santa Maria del Fiore was built over hundreds of years under the vision of multiple architects. The design began in 1296 by Arnolfo di Cambio, and then later continued under Ghiberti, Brunelleschi, and the artists who completed masterpieces for the Basilica’s interior. By the 15th Century, the structure was still without its dome. The design for the dome (first drawn by Cambio) returned to a classical model, like the Roman Pantheon. The original facade of the cathedral as designed by Cambio, also attributed to Giotto, was only completed in its lower half. Later, in 1587, the facade was dismantled by the Medici court and left bare till around 1864 with a competition won by Emilio de Fabris. The facade took on a Neo-Gothic style – white, red, and green marble creating an elegant picture. Three tall bronze doors provide entrances at the main portal beneath lunettes and a row of niches with all twelve apostles. The cast is a detail from the second doorway on the north called the Porta della Mondorla in the Basilica di Santa Maria del Fiore in Florence, also known as the Duomo. The Porta della Mondorla was designed by Niccolo d’ Arezzo c. 1408. The cast shows a small relief depicting women, children, and wildlife in a floral surrounding.

Provenance

The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Dimensions

23 1/4 x 31 1/8 x 3 in. (HWD)

Location:

20 West 44th Street, New York, NY

Gilded panel of Jacob and Esau from Ghiberti’s Gates of Paradise 
Renaissance

This is a full-scale plaster cast version of the bronze Jacob and Esau figure panel of Lorenzo Ghiberti’s Gates of Paradise (1425 – 1452). The bronze panel is currently on display at the Museo dell’Opera del Duomo (Museum of the Works of the Cathedral) in Florence, Italy. According to the Book of Genesis of the Hebrew Torah, Jacob secures the blessing of his father and the command of the Jewish people after stealing the birthright of his brother Esau. The repetition of the arch is one early example of experimentation with perspective during the Italian Renaissance.

Provenance

The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Dimensions

36 x 57 x 9 3/4 in. (HWD)

Location:

20 West 44th Street, New York, NY

The Stigmatization of Saint Francis
Renaissance

This piece is based on a relief panel from a carved pulpit by Benedetto da Maiano in Santa Croce, Florence.

Provenance

The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Dimensions

38 x 41 x 11 in. (HWD)

Location:

20 West 44th Street, New York, NY

Monument of Bishop Leonardo Salutati: Bracket
Renaissance

The Monument of the Bishop Leonardo Salutati resides in the Salutati Chapel of the Cathedral in Fiesole.

Provenance

The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Dimensions

13 x 26 x 11 in. (HWD)

Location:

20 West 44th Street, New York, NY

Basilica di Santa Maria del Fiore: Baptistry Doors; Relief of story of Noah from Ghiberti’s Gates of Paradise 
Renaissance

Plaster cast of the gilt bronze Noah panel of the Gates of Paradise by Lorenzo Ghiberti (1425 – 1452). The bronze panel is currently on display at the Museo dell’Opera del Duomo (Museum of the Works of the Cathedral) in Florence, Italy. According to the Book of Genesis of the Hebrew Torah, God spares Noah and his family from an enormous flood intended to destroy the wicked. In the background of the scene, Noah and his family emerge from the safety of their ark—in this case one that resembles a pyramid, as described by the early Christian theologian Origen—and they embrace under the newly sunny sky. In the foreground, Noah’s son Ham orders his brothers to clothe a semi-nude Noah, inebriated from having indulged too heavily in celebratory wine.

Provenance

The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Dimensions

36 x 57 x 9 3/4 in. (HWD)

Location:

20 West 44th Street, New York, NY

Church of Santa Croce relief panel
Renaissance

Provenance

The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Dimensions

38 x 34 x 7 in.

Location:

20 West 44th Street, New York, NY